Career Coach Kim Marino
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Resumes

50+ Job Seeker’s Tool Kit! Which Resume Format Works Best for You and Why!

 Resume for 50+ Older WorkersAs a professional resume writer and Executive coach, I write blogs for job seekers going through career transition.  You’ll find my blogs written on the topics of resumes, interviewing, social networking, negotiating and many other subjects related to help you through career transition. 

I have been hearing so many stories lately about the functional resume.  Stories that are giving the functional resume a bad rap. I’ve been hearing these stories for years. And, I’ve been writing functional resumes that work great for my clients for 25+ years. So, I would like to educate you on which resume format is best for you and why.  And how to write a functional resume that lands the interview for those that need this resume format.

The best resume format is determined by your future career.

 Not necessarily where you’ve been. But where you are going now. Below is an explanation of the 3 resume formats. 

Resumes Function or Chronological JustResumesUSA.comHere's the 3 resume formats. Which resume format works best for you and why?

1. The chronological resume highlights the progress in your jobs.  This resume format works best for professionals staying in the same profession and moving up in their careers. 

2. The functional resume works best for professionals changing careers or making a lateral change into a different industry or position. It also works well for professionals making a career transition from business owner to a corporate position. 

3. The combination resume works well when only your most recent position is related to the jobs that interest you. 

If you’re 50+ include relevant accomplishments to your resume going back 10 to 15 years. 

This is recommended for all 3 resume formats listed above. If you held previous positions with a job title or company name that adds value, you can finalize your resume with a Previous Employment section and list one-liners with your job title, company name, city and state without the dates or actual accomplishments.

 

resumesLet me share with you the story of Bill. Bill contacted me last week and asked me to review his resume. He just paid a professional resume writing service $400 for his 2-page chronological resume.  This is a good fee for his level of position.  The accomplishments were results-oriented, at least most of them were, not all.  (I recommend all accomplishment be results-oriented.)

The BIG issue in Bill's resume was the format. He needed a functional resume. Why? Read on …

Bill’s resume was written in a chronological format and he was interested in a job where his experience was over 30 years ago.  So, his accomplishments went back to 1978. This resume is NOT going get him any interviews for the jobs that interest him.  And, it will age him. He clearly needed a functional resume.  He told me the professional resume service he hired only wrote chronological resumes.  

Bill didn’t know any better at the time. However, I really think all professional resume writers should know how to write all 3 resume formats. As you can see now, the reason why is because there is only one format that will work best for you to land the interview for the jobs that interest you. The only difference between the resume formats should be the focus and how the information is presented and highlighted. Human Resources is still looking for the same information, i.e., your job titles, who you worked for, what you accomplished and when, going back 10 to 15 years.

How to write a functional resume that will land the interview.

Next, I interviewed Bill as I wrote his functional resume. We included a Career Summary listing his job titles and company names, city, state and dates going back 10 to 15 years. Then, we highlighted 3 primary skills under Selected Accomplishments on the first page of his 2-page resume. For example, we added Program Management, Process Improvement and Team Development where we listed each accomplishment under the appropriate skill.  At the bottom of his 2-page resume we added a final section titled Previous Employment where we listed his job titles, company names, city, state without the dates of previous employment. Employers are interested in what he accomplished going back 10 to 15 years which we listed in the Career Summary on the first page of Bill’s resume.

I hope you enjoyed today’s blog and found this information helpful to you. If you're an Executive with a success story you'd like to share, please email your story to Kim@justresumesusa.com. I'll be happy to write your story and use it to encourage others. 

 

If you are a job seeker, I would like to encourage you to check out HiringforHope.org, and become a member of this very special non profit organization, whose purpose is to help people through career transition. This is where you can volunteer.  And, you too, can make a difference.  

Do you need immediate help with job interviewing, social networking or salary negotiating? Or, maybe you're thinking about hiring a professional resume writer to help you write your resume. I can help. To email me a comment, ask a question or schedule a free initial phone consultation, please give me a call or contact me at www.JustResumesUSA.com.

 

You will find me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. For more weekly career tips on Career Coach Kim Blog, stay tuned …

Top 5 Resume Do’s and Don’ts in 2011

Welcome to my Blog.  As many of you know I write success stories and valuable tips on how to write the resume, prepare for the interview, informational interviewing, social networking, salary negotiating, positive thinking, managing change and mastering success, volunteering and public speaking. 

 

FYI! Next Saturday, May 21, 2011, 10am Mtn, I will be one of the guests on Dream Job Radio, hosted by Daniel Lakskins.  The topic is "Resume Makeovers."  We will be discussing how to make your resume "Pop" to  land quality interviews for the jobs you really want.

 

After reading today's blog, I'd like to invite you to call Dream Job Radio next Saturday, May 21, 2011, 10am Mtn. I will be happy to answer further questions to help you with your resume. 

 

The call in phone number is 760-888-5718.  Today we will be discussing the resume do's and don'ts.  Interested? Read on …

 

Resume Do's 

1. Do choose a job and career that you love.

2. Do create a list of key words on your resume.

3. Do identify a specific objective for your resume.

4. Do write accomplishments that fit the needs of the employer.

5. Do begin each accomplishment with an action verb; end with a specific result.

 

Resume Don'ts

1. Don’t prepare your resume so general, it lacks focus.

2. Don’t replace a job description with a job title.

3. Don’t write accomplishments, unrelated to the jobs you are applying for.

4. Don’t forget to include the result for each accomplishment.

5. Don’t be afraid to show off your skills. 

 

Resume Do's

1. Do choose a job and career that you love.  This is an opportunity to reposition yourself.  Your resume is your marketing document.  You are the product you are marketing.  This is your opportunity to shine and show you’re the world your accomplishments focused on your future job.  If you need help, hire a professional resume writer.

 

2. Do create a list of key words on your resume.  Your key word list will be seen within a 15 second glance, allowing your resume through the initial screening process quickly.  Make the Human Resource Assistant’s job easy to put you in the “Yes pile," to be read by the hiring manager.

 

3. Do identify a specific objective for your resume.  The objective can be a specific job title or a list of 3 skills creating the job(s) you’re applying for now.  It gives the employer a focus.  You’re entire resume should be focused on this objective.

 

4. Do write accomplishments that fit the needs of the employer.  Remember, the purpose of the resume is to land the interview, not the job.  Your accomplishment is an opportunity to briefly tell the employer they need YOU.  You can tell your stories in the interview.

 

5. Do begin each accomplishment with an action verb and end with a specific quantifiable result.  The action verb is the most direct way of stating your role.  Begin each accomplishment with a different action verb.  For example, if your first bullet point is created, your second can begin with developed or established.  End each accomplishment with a result, quantify if possible.  For example, saved the company $50M in 5 years by ….

  

Resumes Don'ts

1. Don’t prepare your resume so general, it lacks focus.  Lack of focus is the #1 reason resumes fail to land the interview.  Focus is the key to landing the interview.

 

2. Don’t replace a job description with a job title.   Your job title does not tell the employer what you did on the job.

 

3. Don’t write accomplishments, unrelated to the jobs you are applying for.  Be selective with the accomplishments you choose for your resume.  Make sure they add value to the employer reading it.  And, if you’re changing industries, search for job descriptions to ensure you’re speaking the same language as the industry you’re applying.  Speaking the same language will tell the employer you are a good fit and ready to make this career change.

 

4. Don’t forget to include the result for each accomplishment.  The #1 mistake I see when I receive resumes, is the result is missing from the accomplishment statement.  The result is what makes you stand out.  The result is what tells the employer they NEED YOU.

 

5. Don’t be afraid to show off your skills.  This is not the time to be humble.  Sound familiar?  Health Care professionals are typically the most humble professionals I’ve coached.  Remember, the resume is where you get credit where credit is due.

  

If you are a job seeker, I would like to encourage you to check out HiringforHope.org, and become a member of this very special non profit organization, whose purpose is to help people through career transition. This is where you can volunteer.  And, you too, can make a difference. I hope you enjoyed today’s blog and found this information helpful to you. If you have useful tips or stories to share, please email me at kim@justresumesusa.com.

 

Do you need immediate help with job interviewing, social networking or salary negotiating? Or, maybe you're thinking about hiring a professional resume writer to help you write your resume. I can help. To email me a comment, ask a question or schedule a free initial phone consultation, please give me a call or contact me at www.JustResumesUSA.com.

 

You will find me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. For more weekly career tips on Career Coach Kim Blog, stay tuned …

Military to Civilian Job Success!

Welcome to this week’s blog.  As a professional resume writer and career coach, I write blogs for job seekers going through career transition.  You will find my blogs written on the topics of resumes, interviewing, social networking, negotiating and many other subjects related to help you through career transition.  Today I will be touching base on tips for job seekers looking for work after serving in the Military and how to use the skills gained from the Military Service. This blog will include tips on writing the resume, interviewing and networking through informational meetings for Military job seekers. These same rules apply for job seekers making a career change to a different industry.

 

Today's blog is a true success story about John. When John came home from serving in the Military, he first got a job as a Store Manager for one of the big retail equipment and office supply chain stores.  When I met him, he had recently been fired from that position after two years at the company. John said he was looking for a similar position.  He was concerned because he was fired by a boss who did not like him and this work was all he knew besides his military training. Sound familiar?   Read on …

 

In my opinion, John was positive, a highly skilled store manager and a great employee.  He was very creative, organized and a motivating team leader.  He was always creating efficient ways to save money for the company.  His boss asked him to do something one day that didn’t work out and he became the scapegoat in the situation.  This is why he lost the job.

 

I noticed John was still speaking the Military Language

I asked him if he would like me to interview him to write a resume for a civilian job using his Military experience.  He said “Yes, I would.”  John’s primary skills came from the Military so we needed to refocus his resume to speak the civilian lingo. We discussed his Military experience and training in budgeting and finance and created a functional resume highlighting these skills and utilized civilian language in his keyword list and accomplishments throughout his resume.  After we completed the resume, John told me he was in the Air Force Academy“This is a high honor,” he said to me. I suggested he start contacting the members he knew from the Air Force Academy and he did.  John did so well networking through the Air Force Academy he never needed to network or look for work anywhere else.

 

John needed a lot of interviewing training to help him transition from Military to civilian language. He interviewed well after a few mock interviews as I helped him eliminate the F-16 fighter jet lingo, critiquing each meeting less and less over time. Within weeks, John had been successfully interviewing with his huge network of Air Force Academy Graduates.  He was so excited when he told me "I landed a great job at one of the federal government agencies as a Budget Analyst.  In addition to a huge increase in salary, I will earn a raise in nine months with a promotion in one year due to my Military status." In addition to this great news, John also received a sign-on bonus giving him the highest starting pay for this position.

 

If you are a job seeker, I would like to encourage you to check out HiringforHope.org, and become a member of this very special non profit organization, whose purpose is to help people through career transition. This is where you can volunteer.  And, you too, can make a difference. I hope you enjoyed today’s blog and found this information helpful to you. If you have useful tips or stories to share, please email me at kim@justresumesusa.com.

 

Do you need immediate help with job interviewing, social networking or salary negotiating? Or, maybe you're thinking about hiring a professional resume writer to help you write your resume. I can help. To email me a comment, ask a question or schedule a free initial phone consultation, please give me a call or contact me at www.JustResumesUSA.com.

 

You will find me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. For more weekly career tips on Career Coach Kim Blog, stay tuned …

Make No Mistake! Proofread Your Entire Resume

Welcome to this week’s blog. As many of you know, I write success stories and valuable tips on how to write resumes, prepare for the interview, informational interviewing, social networking, salary negotiating, positive thinking, managing change and mastering success, volunteering and public speaking. 

This week I’d like to share with you a funny, but not so funny story about why Sidney, an Executive Level, Customer Relationship Manager was getting zero phone calls for interviews from his resume.  He did not receive one call for the first two months. Sidney had a positive attitude as he met with me for a word of encouragement. I remember when it was time for Sidney’s appointment, week after week he reported, again and again, no phone calls for the interview.  We discussed the importance of proofreading his resume, even the header. Sidney took responsibility for the final proofreading of his resume. His resume appeared to be perfect. He was over 50, but it didn’t show on his resume. He listed key words of his skills matching the jobs of interest, his degrees were listed were under his education and he included the results in all his accomplishments. We just couldn’t figure out why his resume was not getting interviews. Soon he discovered the importance of carefully proofreading the phone number in the header of his resume.  Read on…

One day, Sidney came my office for our meeting.  He sat down.  This time with a curious look on his face, he said 

I am so embarrassed to tell you why I wasn’t receiving phone calls for interviews. It was because of the phone number on my resume."

"I haven’t even told my wife yet. I wanted to tell you first.”  Sidney was sending his resume to apply for advertised jobs and to set up his own informational meetings. After making a follow up call from a company he was really interested in, he got a call back from the Chief Operating Officer of the company.  He told Sidney, "I returned your call from Caller ID, however, the phone number on your resume is one digit off." Sidney gratefully thanked the company executive.  After they spoke, he couldn’t help but wonder "Who was getting all the phone calls for his job interviews.  Was he or she interviewing too?" 

Once we corrected the phone number on Sidney’s resume, he set up weekly informational meetings and within three weeks, he landed a great job as the Director of Customer Relationship Management for a Fortune 500 IT corporation.  There are more stories I will share with you about the informational meeting Sidney had that helped him land this job. 

This week the lesson learned is remember to carefully proofread your entire resume, including the header.

 

If you are a job seeker, I would like to encourage you to check out HiringforHope.org, and become a member of this very special non profit organization, whose purpose is to help people through career transition. This is where you can volunteer. And, you too, can make a difference. I hope you enjoyed today’s blog and found this information helpful to you. If you have useful tips or stories to share, please email me at kim@justresumesusa.com.

Do you need immediate help with job interviewing, social networking or salary negotiating? Or, maybe you're thinking about hiring a professional resume writer to help you write your resume. I can help. To email me a comment, ask a question or schedule a free initial phone consultation, please give me a call or contact me at www.JustResumesUSA.com.

You will find me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. For more weekly career tips on Career Coach Kim Blog, stay tuned …